Pineapple Pesto Recipe

INSPIRED BY BRAZIL

pineapple pesto inspired by Brazil
citrus ribs made with pineapple pesto inspired by Brazil
coffee flan made with pineapple pesto inspired by Brazil

Pineapple is said to be indigenous to the area that is today Brazil. Brazilian natives then spread the fruit throughout South and Central America. Pineapple acquired the nickname anana, which means excellent fruit. Nowadays, Brazil is one of the leading producers of pineapple, which is eaten year-round there.

When Christopher Columbus traveled to the New World a second time in 1493, he and his crew discovered anana. They ate the pineapple they found, noting its semblance to a pinecone and its texture comparable to an apple.

pineapple pesto inspired by Brazil
SAVE FOR LATER

Makes 1 1/2 cups

Ingredients

1/3 cup shelled Brazil nuts

2 cups cut fresh pineapple

1 cup fresh basil 

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 teaspoon fresh lime juice

1/8 teaspoon salt

Directions

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a food processor. Blend until the desired consistency forms.

  2. If using a mortar and pestle, crush the Brazil nuts until a fine crumb forms. Add the pineapple and basil, and mash until smooth. Mix in the remaining ingredients. Mash until the desired consistency forms.

  3. Store pesto in an airtight container or jar in the refrigerator for up to one week. Use throughout the week in the next two recipes. Pesto can last in an airtight container in the freezer for up to six months.

Uses

citrus ribs made with pineapple pesto inspired by Brazil

Citrus Ribs

At a Brazilian steakhouse, also known as a churrascaria, rounds and rounds of meat that’s been cooked over a barbecue are served. The dining experience reflects the fireside roasts that gaúchos of southern Brazil had centuries ago. 

coffee flan made with pineapple pesto inspired by Brazil

Coffee Flan

Pudim, or pudding in English, traditionally calls for milk, eggs, and sugar. This dessert is by far the most popular in Brazil, and the most popular drink in the nation is arguably coffee. Not only is Brazil among the top coffee consumers in the world, the country is also one of the leading global coffee producers.