Macadamia Pesto Recipe

INSPIRED BY AUSTRALIA

macadamia pesto inspired by Australia
roasted root vegetables made with macadamia pesto inspired by Australia
anzac biscuits made with macadamia pesto inspired by Australia
SA

Australia is one of the world’s leading producers of macadamia nuts, and they are native to different areas of this country. These nuts got their name from John Macadam, the Scottish-Australian chemist who studied them. It takes macadamia trees seven to ten years until they begin producing nuts, and harvesting is usually done by hand.

Australia doesn’t dominate the food world like other nations, but an important contribution the country made was the macadamia nut. It was discovered by British colonists in Queensland, Australia in 1857.

macadamia pesto inspired by Australia
SAVE FOR LATER

Makes 1 cup

Ingredients

1/3 cup shelled unsalted macadamia nuts

1 cup chopped fresh chives

2 cups watercress

1 garlic clove, peeled

1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese

1/4 cup olive oil

Directions

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a food processor. Blend until the desired consistency forms.

  2. If using a mortar and pestle, crush the macadamia nuts until smooth. Add the chives, watercress, and garlic. Mash until incorporated. Add the cheddar cheese and olive oil. Mash until the desired consistency forms.

  3. Store pesto in an airtight container or jar in the refrigerator for up to one week. Use throughout the week in the next two recipes. Pesto can last in an airtight container in the freezer for up to six months.

Uses

roasted root vegetables made with macadamia pesto inspired by Australia

Kanga-Root Roasted Vegetables

Kangaroo is the national animal of Australia, where kangaroo meat is served in many restaurants. However, kangaroo meat is not as widely available as expected, and even less common outside of Australia. On the other hand, various vegetables grow well in the temperate regions of the country.

anzac biscuits made with macadamia pesto inspired by Australia

ANZAC Biscuits

ANZAC stands for the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, which operated during World War I. While overseas in Europe, ANZAC soldiers received care packages that included sweet biscuits baked by their wives back home. Made without eggs, these biscuits could sustain a longer shelf life.