Lemon Pesto Recipe

INSPIRED BY MYANMAR

lemon pesto inspired by Myanmar
bamboo shoots salad made with lemon pesto inspired by Myanmar
tapioca pudding made with lemon pesto inspired by Myanmar

Lemons are thought to have originated in Burma, which is known as Myanmar today. They were found growing wild and appeared to be a cross between bitter orange and citron. In the 2nd century, the citrus fruit made its way to Europe, Africa, and other Asian nations.

When lemons reached Rome, Italy, they were considered quite rare. The wealthy used them for decoration as well as medicine for curing ailments such as nausea and sea sickness.

lemon pesto inspired by Myanmar
SAVE FOR LATER

Makes 1 1/4 cups

Ingredients

1/4 cup shelled pistachios

1 cup fresh blackberries

1/2 medium lemon, ends removed and cut in half

1/4 cup unsweetened coconut flakes

2 tablespoons ricotta cheese

2 tablespoons honey

Directions

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a food processor. Blend until the desired consistency forms.

  2. If using a mortar and pestle, crush the pistachios until a fine crumb forms. Add the blackberries, lemon, and coconut. Mash until fairly smooth. Mix in the remaining ingredients. Mash until the desired consistency forms.

  3. Store pesto in an airtight container or jar in the refrigerator for up to one week. Use throughout the week in the next two recipes. Pesto can last in an airtight container in the freezer for up to six months.

Uses

bamboo shoots salad made with lemon pesto inspired by Myanmar

Bamboo Shoots Salad

Shrimp and bamboo shoots are key foods in Myanmar’s economy and culture. Shrimp farming is an important industry along the country’s more than 1,800 miles of coastline. Meanwhile, bamboo shoots are popular among Myanmar’s markets.

tapioca pudding made with lemon pesto inspired by Myanmar

Tapioca Pudding

In Myanmar, moh let saung is a dessert similar to tapioca pudding. It’s made with coconut milk and sago. Sago is a starch that comes from palm trees, and sometimes tapioca is used in its place as it’s another form of starch—starch from cassava.