Green Bean Pesto Recipe

INSPIRED BY NEW YORK

green bean pesto inspired by New York
reuben pizza made with green bean pesto inspired by New York
chef salad made with green bean pesto inspired by New York
SA

A native of New York, Calvin Keeney earned the title Father of the Stringless Bean during the mid-19th century when he developed a bean that was less tough and fibrous. He tended over 6,000 acres of peas and beans, and also developed 19 different types of snap beans.

Calvin Keeney’s accomplishments in the bean world climaxed when Burpee Seeds commercially released a stringless green pod in 1894.

green bean pesto inspired by New York
SAVE FOR LATER

Makes 1 3/4 cups

Ingredients

1/2 cup shelled almonds

2 cups fresh green beans cut into 1-inch pieces

1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese

2 garlic cloves, peeled

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

3 tablespoons sesame oil

2 tablespoons water

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a food processor. Blend until the desired consistency forms.

  2. If using a mortar and pestle, crush the almonds until a crumb forms. Add the green beans, Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, and garlic, and mash until smooth. Mix in the remaining ingredients. Mash until the desired consistency forms.

  3. Store pesto in an airtight container or jar in the refrigerator for up to one week. Use throughout the week in the next two recipes. Pesto can last in an airtight container in the freezer for up to six months.

Uses

reuben pizza made with green bean pesto inspired by New York

Reuben Pizza

New York pizza is known for its crust. And the Reuben sandwich is a staple in New York delis. But unknown is how this sandwich got its name. It could have been New York restaurant owner and German immigrant Arnold Reuben. Or it could have been Reuben Kulakofsky in Omaha, Nebraska.

chef salad made with green bean pesto inspired by New York

Chef Salad

The chef who invented the Chef Salad is debatable. Some say it was Chef Diat. Others say Chef Seydoux or Chef Roser. But all three chefs worked in New York hotels during the 20th century, making the salad's geographic origin pretty clear.