Daikon Pesto Recipe

INSPIRED BY JAPAN

daikon pesto inspired by Japan
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sushi stack made with daikon pesto inspired by Japan
edamame made with daikon pesto inspired by Japan

Daikon is also known as Japanese radish or true daikon. It’s a white radish, and its name literally means great root in Japanese. People in Japan find many culinary uses for the root vegetable—from pickling, simmering, or drying daikon to grating it into a soy sauce.

Grated daikon is another common way people in Japan eat this root vegetable. It usually accompanies fish dishes, and it’s also used as a condiment to enhance the flavor of dishes like udon and soba noodles.

daikon pesto inspired by Japan
SAVE FOR LATER

Makes 1 1/2 cups

Ingredients

2 cups cubed daikon radish

2 scallions, chopped

1/4 cup chopped fresh dill

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

2 tablespoons honey

2 tablespoons soy sauce

Directions

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a food processor. Blend until the desired consistency forms.

  2. If using a mortar and pestle, mash the daikon, scallions, and dill until smooth. Mix in the remaining ingredients. Mash until the desired consistency forms.

  3. Store pesto in an airtight container or jar in the refrigerator for up to one week. Use throughout the week in the next two recipes. Pesto can last in an airtight container in the freezer for up to six months.

Uses

sushi stack made with daikon pesto inspired by Japan

Sushi Stack

Alongside the cultivation of rice 2,000 years ago, the Japanese were crafting sushi. The first version developed as a means to preserve fish using fermented rice. Centuries later, people started to eat fish and rice together.

edamame made with daikon pesto inspired by Japan

Edamame

The first documented reference to edamame was made in the 13th century. And it can be found in a Japanese monk’s thank you note written to his parishioner, who gave the monk a gift of these pod-enclosed soybeans. Today in Japan, edamame is a popular snack.